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Jan 21Liked by Mary Ellen Gambutti

Wow, your stories take me back to those old days....vivid details and lovely descriptions. My Gram had a wringer washer in the basement of her rented house on Walnut Street in Des Moines, IA. Sometimes she got her hand caught in the wringer, so I never helped her. I remember the fresh, sunny scent of dried laundry and crisp, clean cotton sheets.

How times have changed! My friend, Tom, hung quilts outside on the line here in the Hamptons and someone reported him to the town, as this is not allowed! Imagine.

I never met my maternal great-grandmother, but Gram was one of 14 kids. I never had aunts, uncles, or cousins, as both my parents were only children, but often spent time out in the Iowa countryside visiting great aunts and uncles and my mother's many cousins. Gram was not the youngest of the brood, but she was the last to die and felt so lonely after all her siblings were gone. Now I can understand her feelings as my most of my maternal relatives are gone, too.

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Jan 21Liked by Mary Ellen Gambutti

Wonderfully enticing with lovely details and unforgettable images.

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Beautifully written and really like the descriptions. I know that woodiness of the clothespins and remember one of my grandmothers used to hang dry clothes when she and my grandfather lived in a rural area. I remember they had a clothesline that must have been 30-40 yards long. She always had a massive bucket of wood clothespins next to a post for the clothesline.

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