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May 20Liked by Mary Ellen Gambutti

So many echoes.

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May 20Liked by Mary Ellen Gambutti

Your writing in such an outline form as if a clinical report of factual information underscores your need for truth: to know it and to tell it. Lying is a way of coping, I'm sure. Now standing in the truth, you are healing.

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@Katestoryteller thank you! I hadn't thought of the structure in that way, and now you say it, yes! Outlining the way myths, secrecy, and lies around adoption affected adoptees, perhaps especially of that era. Thank you x

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May 20Liked by Mary Ellen Gambutti

Your format really hit me, like bullet points. xo

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Then, awesome ❤

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So many mixed emotions. My mother was adopted, and when I tell other adoptees that she was adopted by her grandmother they seem to minimize and discount the pain she endured, as if she had it so much better because she was adopted by family. My mother never knew her parents, was troubled her entire life, eventually succumbing to her addictions, heart and lung disease, and other ailments by age 61. She never looked more peaceful than when I saw her on her deathbed.

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@j.e.moyer thank you so much for reading and your thoughts of your mother's personal tragedy. It seems no matter what our adopted circumstances, there are those who tell us our adoption was blessed. Those folks would be the ones who in the same breath say we should be grateful. Maybe it's their attempt to make sense of the loss. "It could have been worse." hugs.

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