10 Comments

You have a brilliant way of luring the reader in to the scenes you create. Your story resonates with me, especially the "died in an accident" part and all of the wondering about that for the remainder of my life.

Expand full comment
author

So kind of you, Doreen. And thank you for sharing what it means to you. Statements like that, however well-intentioned- can have an unfortunate effect on a sensitive child.

Expand full comment
May 26Liked by Mary Ellen Gambutti

Thanks so much, Mary, Ellen. Thisis great.

My birthmom adopted 2 kids 10 and 12 years after I was born, but she and her husband never bothered to tell them. About 12 years later, however, the family was on a trip and my sister (her adaughter) was reading a book in the backseat and came across "adoption." She asked my bmom to explain what that meant, and was told "that's what you are. Don't evee ask about it again."

Expand full comment
author

Hi Marley, So glad it resonates. Please feel free to share if you'd like to. X Mel

Expand full comment
May 26Liked by Mary Ellen Gambutti

That vague sensation of not seeing but needing to see is powerful, lost in the woods.

Expand full comment
author

Thank you, Kate ๐Ÿ™

Expand full comment
May 26Liked by Mary Ellen Gambutti

What the heck? It's not even an essay. I don't know what it is except it's one of the coolest adoption stories I've ever read. Thanks for pouring your heart and soul into words. Brilliantly done. (At least it worked for me!)

Expand full comment
author
May 26ยทedited May 26Author

Thank you, Jerry! Lyric essay can take many forms, but given the limitations of crafting it on Substack, my spacing and layout are pretty straightforward. :)

Expand full comment
May 26Liked by Mary Ellen Gambutti

This is so moving! Beautifully written.

Expand full comment
author

Thanks so much, Jill!

Expand full comment